Kim Snyder

Think Pink Breast Cancer awareness month
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Kim Snyder

Kim Snyder

As a survivor of a brain tumor at age 21 I thought my cancer experience was behind me, but in June of 2020 I had my routine screening mammogram and learned another cancer journey was in front of me.    I cannot say enough about our outstanding clients at American Radiology in Dallas that gently pulled me aside and said, “we do not like what we see”, but it appears to be in the early stages.  

Over the course of 3 months, while I am privileged to guide radiologists in radiology documentation, I learned firsthand about Ultrasound, MRI, and Stereotactic guided biopsies.  The radiologists at American Radiology guided me through the experience, not as a partner in documentation or billing, but as a patient that was going through a crisis.  I cannot say enough about their professionalism, clinical expertise and compassion in my patient experience.

 

In August, was bilateral mastectomies, and over the course of several months breast reconstructions.   I am grateful with new technology in mammography and the use of Breast Tomography, we caught the cancer very early.  My lymph nodes were clear, so no chemo or radiation.  As a cancer patient I was assigned a Nurse Navigator from Sammons Cancer Center in Dallas, that guided me through my breast cancer journey.  Not only did they support me, but reached out to my family as well, to make sure they had everything they needed to support our journey ahead.  

It is easier to reflect when your journey is in the rear view mirror.  There are very real moments that for me were defining.  My faith, my family (my rock), my friends, and my colleagues and even clients at MSN.  From the top to the bottom, I was given permission…..to breath, to take care of myself and my family.  The constant texts, phone calls, cards, flowers, on and on, humbled me.  I had not ever….experienced an employer, a team releasing me from my day to day, to concentrate on my recovery both physical and emotional.  For that I am, and my family will be eternally grateful.    

In retrospect, if you receive that dreaded diagnosis, cry…..give yourself permission to grieve to cry, more than once, as many times as you need to.  When you feel overwhelmed, cry.  Sit  in the shower and just cry.  There will be time for bravery, but as you work through the new journey, embrace the emotion then you are better able to navigate your day to day, knowing you got it out.  For me…I was then better able to navigate the normal things in my life.  Share your intimate fears, in your prayer time, and with those that will be your cheerleader.  Surround yourself with those that will encourage you in your journey.  Remember, your spouse, perhaps, your family, they are on the journey with you, and they are processing too.  For us, the Snyder family, our hearts are still tender, in that life is fragile, but we love deeper and have found ourselves with a deeper level of gratitude in having a next day.